Sacramento has yet to show any serious efforts at facilitating job creation. While politicians can tout their giving wealthy producers sizeable tax credits to keep their film and television projects in the state, it is obvious that picking and…

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That there are more poor folks living in California than any other state is unsurprising, inasmuch as California boasts at least 12 million more residents than any other state. What surprised us was the report last week by the Census Bureau…

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Before he became one, Gavin Newsom called for the elimination of the do-nothing, waste-of-money lieutenant governor’s post. Although you don’t hear Newsom pushing to eliminate the job he now holds, he was right. In these modern times, there is little need for a lieutenant governor to step in when the governor is out of state or out of reach…

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Voters are faced with choosing between two highly qualified candidates for California secretary of state on the Nov. 4 ballot. »

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The scope and importance of the Santa Clara County Board of Education took a significant leap in recent years when it began evaluating charter school petitions and overseeing the schools’ performance. That’s in addition to the board’s traditional role of governing early childhood education, special education and alternative schools.Charter schools are one of the hottest controversies in county education circles, especially when it comes to Rocketship schools, which attempted a rapid expansion that has been stopped or at least slowed by a court ruling. The county board needs knowledgeable members who will work collaboratively with the county’s 31 school districts on charter proposals, which parents often support. It also needs continuity, having just hired its third superintendent since 2008. …

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A sometimes-elusive goal in the justice system is to ensure the punishment fits the crime. When the punishment is punitive — a fine or jail time — the hope is that the financial slap or the time locked up will discourage the offender

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That process, however, has reached a critical juncture. The U.S.

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If you believe Houston Mayor Annise Parker, then you have to believe that when lawyers for her city subpoenaed five local pastors and demanded their sermons, the episode represented an unfortunate instance of lawyer overreach, with no intent to harass or intimidate the opposition. There is to be no popular vote on whether to retain or repeal the measure — and probably no New York Times editorial about heavy-handed voter suppression in Texas. …

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Let’s focus on the candidates’ many differences, not gutter rumors.

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Who is investing in Rialto’s future?Businesses. Property owners.

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Jerry Brown’s third term as governor has shown the benefits of having a chief executive with stature and self-confidence born of experience. The benefits and, occasionally, the pitfalls.The biggest benefit has been the way Brown has exerted his influence over the California Legislature, reining in spending by the Democratic majority, helping to dig the state out of a budget deficit.

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America’s attitudes toward immigration have always been complicated. Influenced by world events, the U.S. embraces some immigrants and demonizes others, and it can be difficult to understand the logic…

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Immigration is the definitive wedge issue in American politics, but it doesn’t have to be. When the Senate’s Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act failed to pass the House this year, it was the third such failure of comprehensive reform in a decade. Here’s a good rule: Three strikes, you’re out. It’s time for a different approach. …

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Never let it be said that Mother Nature doesn’t appreciate irony. A new study led by researchers at Occidental College and UC Santa Barbara has found that the oil platforms dotting the California coast are fantastic for sea life.In a 15-year study, researchers found that the ecosystems that build up around artificial rigs host 1,000% more fish and other sea life than natural habitats such as reefs and estuaries. The California rigs outstripped even famously rich ecosystems such as the coral reefs of Polynesia.EditorialRELATED: Like fish? …

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A Texas university refuses to accept students from Nigeria, where there were a couple dozen Ebola cases before the disease was quickly stopped. Louisiana refuses to allow incinerated trash from the treatment of Texas’ first Ebola victim, Thomas Eric Duncan, into its landfills, as though the…

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Highlighting a sea change in how Americans donate money, four of the 10 charitable organizations that received the most private contributions last year administer donor-advised funds, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy. People can put cash, stock or other assets into a donor-advised fund at one of these organizations and get an immediate tax deduction. …

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In uncertain economic times — meaning, all times — Californians are given some solace in knowing that they have a few greenbacks socked away.Or at least in knowing that they should have such a rainy day fund, an important line item in the family budget that they will get to any day now.Because when the downpour eventually comes, and it will, and there isn’t any money set aside to fix the leaky roof, everyone gets wet.

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In uncertain economic times — meaning, all times — Californians are given some solace in knowing that they have a few greenbacks socked away.Or at least in knowing that they should have such a rainy day fund, an important line item in the family budget that they will get to any day now.Because when the downpour eventually comes, and it will, and there isn’t any money set aside to fix the leaky roof, everyone gets wet.

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Ruminating on the ever-widening gap between America’s rich and poor, Federal Reserve Board Chairwoman Janet Yellen, in a widely reported speech on Friday, said: “I think it is appropriate to ask whether this trend is compatible with values rooted in our nation’s history, among them the high value Americans have traditionally placed on equality of opportunity.” Could have been said about the Gilded Age and the 1920s, when similar questions were raised and, incidentally, gave rise to a formulation called the “Great Gatsby curve,” the relationship between income inequality and low social mobility that recent economists came up with. “The past several decades have seen the most sustained rise in inequality since the 19th century after more than 40 years of narrowing inequality following the Great Depression,” Yellen said, citing the Federal Reserve’s triennial Survey of Consumer Finances, published last month, and other data. While some inequality will always be with us, says Yellen, she offers offers “four building blocks of opportunity” to help level the playing field. this will require more government spending, a stronger social safety net, and reforming how public education is paid for. A significant source of wealth,” notes Yellen, but much harder to get, especially for those in the lower income categories, where business ownership “has fallen to a 25-year low, and equity in those businesses, adjusted for inflation, is at its lowest point since the mid-1990s.

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Viet Nguyen, a Westminster high school student, was seduced into a criminal street gang. When a home-invasion robbery for which the teenager was supposed to be the lookout went sideways, he was subsequently shot, execution-style, in the back of the…

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Brown’s next agenda is everyone’s guess

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From business to environmental activists, community leaders agree that protecting open space is important not just to our quality of life but to continuing to expand business and job opportunities.

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Sighs of relief were audible all around California the other day, when the embattled, disgraced Michael Peevey announced he would not seek reappointment to a third six-year term as president of the powerful California Public Utilities Commission.But the relief was premature. And Peevey’s announcement is not nearly enough to restore credibility to this tainted agency.

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If there’s one healthy principle for policy-makers facing a crisis, it should be “first, do no harm.” But addressing the long-term slide in voter turnout in the city of Los Angeles, a council committee has rushed forward a plan to move city elections to even years. The proposal is a dangerous step backwards for taxpayers, for voters, and for democracy in L.

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The Obama administration’s implementation of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals initiative in 2012 gave undocumented immigrants brought to the United States before their 16th birthday a chance to stay in America. But for children wanting to go to college, that was where their dream ended. Federal financial aid was not yet available to them.

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Last year, the city of Whittier was sued under California’s Voting Rights Act. Roughly half of the city’s registered voters are Latino — yet, in its 116-year history, only one Latino has been elected to the five-member City Council. None have been elected in the last decade. According…

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As we considered two fireworks-related measures on the county’s Nov. 4 ballot – Measure T in Huntington Beach and Measure II in Villa Park – our thoughts turned to Hiram Johnson, who served two terms as California’s governor. His enduring…

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Just this week, we took to these pages to voice our support for the growing tolerance that characterizes Americans’ attitudes toward homosexuals, a dynamic that has undergone a radical change in recent years. As staunch believers in individual…

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